Wednesday, August 27, 2014

CMU CyLab Researchers Wins USENIX Security 2014 Best Student Paper Award; Seven Other CMU Papers Delivered

As with other leading conferences in the vital fields of cyber security and privacy, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) CyLab researchers distinguished themselves at USENIX Security 2014, the 23rd USENIX Security Symposium, held in San Diego, California, 8/20/14-8/22/14.

Three hundred fifty papers were submitted to the USENIX program committee, and the ensuing process, which involved 1,340 reviews and 1,627 follow up comments, resulted in sixty-seven papers being accepted for publication, including several from CMU CyLab researchers.

Most notably, CMU's Kyle Soska won one of two Best Student Paper Awards for Automatically Detecting Vulnerable Websites Before They Turn Malicious co-authored with CyLab faculty member Nicolas Christin

Additionally, CyLab faculty member David Brumley co-authored three of the published papers:

BYTEWEIGHT: Learning to Recognize Functions in Binary Code, with Tiffany Bao, Jonathan Burket, and Maverick Woo of Carnegie Mellon University and Rafael Turner, University of Chicago.

Blanket Execution: Dynamic Similarity Testing for Program Binaries and Components, with Manuel Egele, Maverick Woo and Peter Chapman.

Optimizing Seed Selection for Fuzzing, with Alexandre Rebert, Carnegie Mellon University and ForAllSecure; Sang Kil Cha and Thanassis Avgerinos of Carnegie Mellon University; Jonathan Foote and David Warren of Software Engineering Institute CERT; Gustavo Grieco of Centro Internacional Franco Argentino de Ciencias de la Información y de Sistemas (CIFASIS) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET).

Brumley also delivered a paper for one of the workshops that proceeded the main body of the Symposium itself, PicoCTF: A Game-Based Computer Security Competition for High School Students, co-authored with Peter Chapman and Jonathan Burket, also from CMU.

CyLab Usable Security and Privacy (CUPS) Lab director Lorrie Cranor teamed up with Cormac Herley, Principal Researcher in the Machine Learning Department at Microsoft Research, and several colleagues, Saranga Komanduri and Richard Shay of CMU and Stuart Schechter of Microsoft Research to co-author Telepathwords: Preventing Weak Passwords by Reading Users' Minds 

Two other CMU-authored papers were presented at USENIX Security 2014

The Long "Taile" of Typosquatting Domain Names co-authored by Janos Szurdi, Carnegie Mellon University; Balazs Kocso and Gabor Cseh, Budapest University of Technology and Economics; Jonathan Spring, Carnegie Mellon University; Mark Felegyhazi, Budapest University of Technology and Economics; and Chris Kanich, University of Illinois at Chicago. 

Password Managers: Attacks and Defenses co-authored by David Silver, Suman Jana, and Dan Boneh, Stanford University; Eric Chen and Collin Jackson, Carnegie Mellon University

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